Tag Archives: time

Who should be responsible for policy evaluation?

The Guardian has published a note by Nick Axford on when a charity might wish to carry out a randomised controlled trial. Axford works for a charity which promotes the use of evidence in designing services for children and families.  … Continue reading

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Time use surveys and volunteering

I’ve been reading up on the available (UK) time use data on volunteering and found a short technical paper produced by Kimberley Fisher from the Centre for Time Use Research.  The paper’s interesting in its own right, but here’s what … Continue reading

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Time-varying covariates III

A thought occurs.  Longitudinal data allows change to be studied within individuals was well as within populations.  This is ‘a good thing’.  You can look at whether a training programme affected an individual’s employment status, for example.  Or whether breakfast … Continue reading

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Population projection – and it’s depressing

My take-home message from today was slightly depressing.  Sure, women do indeed live longer than men – but they live nearly all of those extra years with a disability.  Sigh…  I have a lingering interest in long-term care (for which … Continue reading

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Time-varying covariates II

My division runs a reading group.  The subject is always methodological – this semester it’s a textbook on longitudinal data analysis (“Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis: Modeling Change and Event Occurrence” by Singer and Willett, for those who are interested).  The … Continue reading

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Time-varying covariates

In an analysis of longitudinal data, you find variables which change over time (e.g. marital status) and those that do not (e.g. date of birth).  I was forced to think about the place of time-varying covariates in longitudinal data analysis … Continue reading

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