Tag Archives: longitudinal

Another advantage of longitudinal data

I have been having trouble formulating an important argument in one of my PhD papers, so I’m going to rehearse it here.  If anyone could help me to refine it, I’d be eternally grateful if you’d let me know… Longitudinal … Continue reading

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Who should be responsible for policy evaluation?

The Guardian has published a note by Nick Axford on when a charity might wish to carry out a randomised controlled trial. Axford works for a charity which promotes the use of evidence in designing services for children and families.  … Continue reading

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Having trouble funding your longitudinal data collection…?

My friend Francis Brearley was running into just such a problem and has decided to try crowd-sourcing i.e. asking many people to fund a little of the project.  (If you’re in the US, you’ll be familiar with the technique through … Continue reading

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Thinking out loud about differences between surveys

What with one thing (daughter’s chickpox) and other (holiday in the US) and all the stuff in between (more bank holidays than you can shake a stick at at), I haven’t been here for a while.  I’m rapidly rolling towards … Continue reading

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More infant feeding research

The Telegraph and Observer have both published articles based on Maria Iacovou’s research (presumably this working paper) on the cognitive effects of breastfeeding.  It’s based on data from ALSPAC, a detailed and interesting (if slightly flawed) longitudinal dataset from Bristol.  Once … Continue reading

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What kind of day has it been?

Please excuse the shameless West Wing quote in the title…  It occurs to me that I haven’t really written much about my project and maybe I should remedy that.  I’m going to write a three papers thesis (rather than the traditional … Continue reading

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Surviving the hazard (yes, that is what passes for a demography joke…)

Hill Kulu gave a seminar on housing and fertility at Southampton last week.  He did use the words “linear spline” on a couple of occasions, but otherwise it was extremely accessible.  He had used a hazard model to examine housing type, house moves … Continue reading

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Metadata>paradata. Discuss.

Today’s S3RI methodology seminar was given by Gabi Durrant and Julia D’Arrigo.  The subject was paradata, which I’m pretty sure is data which describes the process of survey data collection.  It might be data about the person conducting the interviews, or … Continue reading

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Values and conflict in the voluntary sector

Malin Arvidson, who is part of the Third Sector Research Centre, gave a seminar yesterday about some of the work she has been doing on the Real Times project.  The Real Times project is longitudinal (which means that it follows people … Continue reading

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Time-varying covariates III

A thought occurs.  Longitudinal data allows change to be studied within individuals was well as within populations.  This is ‘a good thing’.  You can look at whether a training programme affected an individual’s employment status, for example.  Or whether breakfast … Continue reading

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