Author Archives: Vicki Bolton

The tax payer buys some data. Now who owns it? A private research company.

It turns out that when the Government commissions research (including data collection) from a private research company, it is not standard practice to require, as part of the contract, that the data is later placed in the UK Data Archive.  … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on The tax payer buys some data. Now who owns it? A private research company.

Who should be responsible for policy evaluation?

The Guardian has published a note by Nick Axford on when a charity might wish to carry out a randomised controlled trial. Axford works for a charity which promotes the use of evidence in designing services for children and families.  … Continue reading

Posted in Academic research, Journalism | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Who should be responsible for policy evaluation?

First, select your cohort

The first of the national cohort studies, the one begun one week in March 1946 has been the subject of a series of Radio 4 interviews and a newspaper article this week.  A cohort study follows a group of people (the cohort) … Continue reading

Posted in PhD | Tagged | Comments Off on First, select your cohort

“…part of what I call the Big Society…”

The Prime Minister has gone and brought it up again.  I confess that I’m a little slow off the mark, and this is actually from before Christmas (thank you to George Disney for pointing it out to me) but I … Continue reading

Posted in Government, PhD | Tagged | 1 Comment

Time use surveys and volunteering

I’ve been reading up on the available (UK) time use data on volunteering and found a short technical paper produced by Kimberley Fisher from the Centre for Time Use Research.  The paper’s interesting in its own right, but here’s what … Continue reading

Posted in Methods, PhD | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Time use surveys and volunteering

Having trouble funding your longitudinal data collection…?

My friend Francis Brearley was running into just such a problem and has decided to try crowd-sourcing i.e. asking many people to fund a little of the project.  (If you’re in the US, you’ll be familiar with the technique through … Continue reading

Posted in Academic research, Methods | Tagged , | Comments Off on Having trouble funding your longitudinal data collection…?

Infant feeding again. And peer reviewed journals again. Resulting in an overlong post. Again.

According to the Guardian (and the Daily Mail, Channel 4 News etc etc) we’ve learned that babies fed on demand ‘do better at school’.  This makes me sound smug but I learned this a year ago when the first author, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Infant feeding again. And peer reviewed journals again. Resulting in an overlong post. Again.

AntiSocial Science: ‘research has revealed’ that we shouldn’t trust a press release

Research has also revealed some fairly predictable stuff about the best laid plans of mice and men.  There was briefly the promise that I might get paid to blog, but it evaporated, so my blog gets the benefit.  This was … Continue reading

Posted in Journalism | Tagged | Comments Off on AntiSocial Science: ‘research has revealed’ that we shouldn’t trust a press release

Volunteering, social class and some other things

The NCVO/VSSN Researching the Voluntary Sector Conference took place in London last week.  Many of the big names were there, but a lot of the stuff I found most interesting came from Jon Dean, a doctoral researcher at the University … Continue reading

Posted in Academic research | Tagged , | Comments Off on Volunteering, social class and some other things

Peer reviewed article ‘wrong’ shock

Dave Johns at Slate has written an interesting piece on self-publication and peer review, using a recent study about ‘social contagion’ as a peg.  I wrote a post back in March about some of the pitfalls of peer review.  In … Continue reading

Posted in Journalism | Tagged | 2 Comments